Test 43

Task 1. You will hear people talking in different situations. Listen and mark the sentences T (true) or F (false).

1. The girl needed the extra cash and helped her fellow classmate.

2. She decided to become a photographer to fulfill a lifelong ambition.

3. The girl feels nervous before she competes.

4. Being out on the football pitch is so boring for girls.

5. The backpacker travelled to the top of the mountain by tour bus.

 

Task 2. Read the text. Choose one of the variants A, B, C or D.

1. When was Blarney Castle built?
B over 500 years ago

2. What was the author’s complaint about the stairs in the castle?
B they weren’t wide enough

3. How did the soldiers defend the castle?
A by pouring hot water or tar on them

4. Which statement is true?
C the use of the castle has changed over time

5. How did the author learn to kiss the Blarney Stone?
C he watched other people kiss it

6. Which word best describes how the author felt about the visit?
B puzzled

 

Task 3. Read the text. Choose one of the variants A, B, C or D.

Oscar Wilde once remarked that he disliked arguments as they were always vulgar and often convincing. What, then, is the difference between an argument and a quarrel? Look the word “quarrel” up in a dictionary and you will find it defines it (1) A as an “angry argument”. It seems that “angry” is the key word here. Both quarrelling and arguing involve disagreements, but it is only during the former that we become angry or upset.

We may raise our voices or even display aggressive behaviour when quarrelling, (2) C whereas in an argument, we maintain a level tone of voice and refrain from physically threatening our (3) B opponent.

Consequently, should we forget the differences in content. An argument is a discussion or debate in which two or more people put forward different or opposing (4) B views.

Evidence and logic may be used (5) A in order to support the speaker’s point of view and possibly to convince the other(s).

Knowing that there are hot-tempered people around, they may get carried away in an argument so that it degenerates into a quarrel, but it should, (6) A generally speaking, be a dispassionate exchange of views rather than a shouting match.